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This is why Britain could be set for the longest heatwave in over 40 years

The recent and continuous hot weather throughout the UK has been a welcome change, breaking records as the temperature continues to rise.

After basking in warm sunshine for the past week and a half, if the hot weather continues the nation is on course to beat the summer of 1976.

After basking in warm sunshine for the past week and a half,if the hot weather continues the nation is on course to beat the summer of 1976

After basking in warm sunshine for the past week and a half,if the hot weather continues the nation is on course to beat the summer of 1976

During the same summer months in 1976, the nation saw 15 consecutive days of extremely hot weather which led to one the worst droughts in 150 years.

Today marks the 12th day of high temperatures which have been lingering around 27C and if this continues the record could surpass that of summer 1976.

June was already a record-breaking month in regards to the hot weather, as high pressure dominated the UK weather and brought more than the normal share of fine sunny days, with high temperatures and very little rainfall.

Mean temperatures showed that it was the warmest June on record for Northern Ireland and Wales and Scotland recorded its highest ever temperature. The Met Office reported that the highest temperature in Scotland was 33.2C, this being recorded in Motherwell, breaking a record set back in 2003.

The recent and continuous hot weather throughout the UK has been a welcome change, breaking records as the temperature continues to rise

The recent and continuous hot weather throughout the UK has been a welcome change, breaking records as the temperature continues to rise

During June, daytime temperatures on average were 19.9C (67.8F), this being the same as the famed summer of 1976 and a joint second behind the average of 20.6C (69.1F) in June 1940.

June was also a very dry month for much of the UK, with much of England and Wales ranking within the top five driest June’s on record, with figures dating back to 1910.

A record set in the 1920’s was broken for the South-east and Central Southern England region, where 3.0 mm of rainfall was recorded, just 6% of what would normally be expected for the month as a whole.

The Met Office explain that as we head through the beginning of July all indications show that much of the UK will stay dry and very warm with plenty of sunshine.

However, some showery conditions or a few thundery showers could be possible at times.

Met Office Press Officer Bonnie Diamond said the weather will be: “Warm and dry with plenty of sunny spells for many for the rest of the week, though a little cloudier with perhaps a few isolated, heavy showers in the south at times. Into the weekend it’ll stay largely dry with further sunshine, turning very warm or hot again in the south, though a touch cooler and cloudier in the far north at times”.

UV levels will also continue to be either high or very high during this warm and sunny spell and people are urged to take care when enjoying the weather outside.

Dr Thomas Waite from Public Health England said: “We know that when weather like this hits many people will head outdoors and make the most of the sunshine – but for others high temperatures, over more than a day or two, can be really uncomfortable and pose a significant risk to health.

“It’s vitally important that we keep an eye on friends, family and neighbours who may be at risk. For others the best thing to do is avoid the sun during the hottest parts of the day, carry water with you when travelling and if going out to large events”.

For more information and current weather forecasts visit: metoffice.gov.uk/