The Under the Hammer column with Hartleys Auctioneers

This 17th century oak low dresser sold for �2,900 at Hartleys Autumn Sale in Ilkley.
This 17th century oak low dresser sold for �2,900 at Hartleys Autumn Sale in Ilkley.

Probably the most mixed selection of items to be offered in a single sale represented Hartleys Autumn Fine Sale in Ilkley.

Starting with ceramics, a signed Satsuma 3½” bowl trebled its lower estimate to reach £1,650 and a large Wemyss pig from the most famous Scottish pottery went within estimate at £850.

This pair of Arts and Crafts candlesticks realised �3,000 at the sale.

This pair of Arts and Crafts candlesticks realised �3,000 at the sale.

After England’s success in the Cricket World Cup, cricketing items seem to be on the rise with a Doulton Lambeth stoneware jug featuring various players selling well at £800.

It is always difficult to be certain how current commodity prices will affect an auction but certainly silver is at a current high.

In this section a most attractive pair of Arts and Crafts candlesticks with blue enamel decoration reached £3,000, an ornate William IV four piece tea and coffee service went above estimate at £1,150, and a Charles II seal top spoon dated around 1665 achieved £1,150.

The best watch to start the jewellery section was a Heuer chronograph dated 1949 which found its lower estimate of £1,200 and the top price in the jewellery was an above estimate £4,000 for a solitaire diamond ring of around 2cts with diamond set shoulders ripe and ready for engagement.

This Doulton Lambeth stoneware jug featuring various players sold for �800.

This Doulton Lambeth stoneware jug featuring various players sold for �800.

At this time of year there are usually weapons and field sports items on offer.

A deactivated Mauser broom handle pistol comfortably exceeded estimate at £950 while a rare 28 bore side-by-side ejector shotgun and case sailed well past to finish at £2,900.

In the generally unclassifiable works of art section, the highest price went to an Egyptian carved marble head, its only provenance being good enough having been purchased in Egypt in 1917 and this sold for £4,400.

Although representing our counties favourite past time, the penny farthing racing bike doubled its top estimate at £3,200 and sold to a German buyer.

The catalogue cover picture proved the consistently strong market in 20th century design with an Art Deco bronze and ivory group by Otto Poertzel leaving the estimate standing to sell at £3,200.

Finishing off the sale in a typically eclectic fashion a carved sandstone mask “The Green Man” sold for £1,050, a comedic pen and ink by William Heath Robinson entitled “Strenuous Endeavours to Keep the Family Cool on a Warm Day at Southend” found £2400 and a brass water wheel clock driven by ball bearings sold well at £1,450.

Of the more traditional lots a handsome longcase clock with eight day movement and brass dial by J Whitehurst, Derby raced past its estimate to find £3,400 and a 17th century oak low dresser incorporating nine drawers made £2,900; proving where there is quality brown furniture is not always a market turn off.