Eye op Husky Loki sniffs out new life

A husky who was slowly going blind due to a painful condition, has rediscovered her zest for life after having both eyes removed.

Thursday, 1st July 2021, 2:02 pm
Updated Thursday, 1st July 2021, 2:07 pm
Loki the Knaresborough Husky who had both her eyes removed.
Loki the Knaresborough Husky who had both her eyes removed.

Loki underwent a double enucleation at Ashleigh Vet Clinic in Knaresborough in what was the first time vets at the practice had performed the procedure.

The much-loved family pet suddenly lost her sight in both eyes and the pain, which was comparable to having a chronic migraine, was starting to cause her distress.

Examinations found no specific reason for the cause of her sight loss and there was no cure to save her vision.

Loki, right, and Snow.

To relieve the uncontrollable pain, vet Sean Cunningham advised removing both eyes in a double enucleation, where the eye is completely removed and the eyelid skin is then stitched closed over the eye socket. 

Loki has made a full recovery and has bounced back to her old self, much to the relief and joy of owners Elizabeth Thomasson, her partner Nick Tidey and son Joe Thomasson, who live in Knaresborough.

She is even achieving celebrity status when out walking through the town. People want to stop and talk with her owners when they see the happy dog trotting along has no eyes.

Vet Sean said: “It was clear that Loki was losing vision in both her eyes and wasn’t going to get any better.

“Eye pressure checks were double what they should have been, her pupils were very dilated and the membrane around the eye was swollen.

“The only way to control the pain was to remove the eyes and it is actually a straightforward procedure, with less risks than removing only one eye.

“It was the first time I have performed a double enucleation and the way Loki recovered straightaway was very pleasing.

“Dogs who have undergone a double enucleation can lead happy, fulfilling lives. They can be even happier as they are out of pain.

“Smell is the predominant sense for a dog so they can adapt to losing their sight because they don’t view the world in the same way that we do.

“Having seen Loki out and about, it is clear she is enjoying a normal life again and it’s very satisfying to see that.”

Loki’s owners were worried about their pet adapting to life with no sight and considered carefully whether they should put the nine-year-old through the operation.

But she is even taking the lead on walks ahead of her brother, Snow.

Elizabeth said: “It was a shock when I heard what was wrong and we were upset.

“But Sean was very reassuring and we have now realised that this was not the worst outcome.

“She is managing really well and can navigate on walks, using her nose much more.

“It is clear that Snow is watching out for her and helping to guide her, although she likes to lead when we’re out on walks.

“Loki is such an affectionate, loving dog that we wanted to do the best for her, so we’re so happy it has been a positive outcome.”