I’m betting on a White Christmas

Odds have been slashed on a White Christmas.''Photo: David Jones/PA Wire
Odds have been slashed on a White Christmas.''Photo: David Jones/PA Wire

IT’S THE stuff Christmas dreams are made of.

Odds have been slashed on a White Christmas as some forecasters predict Britain is set for its coldest winter in five years.

According the Met Office, the last official White Christmas was in 2010 - when it recorded snow on the ground at 83 per cent of its weather stations, the highest amount ever recorded.

The Daily Mirror is today predicting 36 days of snow over the winter, and say bookmakers Coral have slashed the odds of snow falling anywhere in the UK on Christmas Day to even money.

William Hill is currently offering odds of just 3-1 on a White Christmas in Leeds.

AccuWeather forecaster Tyler Roys told the Mirror: “We’ll see full-on cold spells. Northern England faces colder than normal period, some of which could affect southern England. And Scotland is forecast a colder than normal winter too.

“Given recent winters’ minimum temperatures of -8C to -21C, lows of that level are possible this winter.”

Last week we reported on predictions of months of heavy snow and the worst winter in half a century.

Weather warning: Yorkshire ‘set for months of snow’
James Madden, forecaster for Exacta Weather, said the first flakes of snow could arrive in just two weeks’ time.

He said: “It is likely to turn significantly colder from mid October onwards.

“This is likely to bring the first significant snow of winter above higher ground in parts of Scotland and potentially to some well-elevated parts of Northern Ireland.

“Some potentially wintry showers could develop in some other parts of the country during the evening or overnight when temperatures will dip to some quite chilly values with the strong influence of some cool northerly winds.

“The cold winds will allow it to be more settled, but during some periods of showers or unsettled weather we could see some wintry showers developing in places, particularly in some rural parts of the country.”