More money for Harrogate council's car share scheme to try tackle the town's tail-to-tail traffic

Harrogate Borough Council will pump more than £23,000 into its car sharing scheme - as part of its drive to tackle the town's tail-to-tail traffic.

Wednesday, 11th March 2020, 2:08 pm
Updated Wednesday, 11th March 2020, 2:08 pm

The scheme sees users of a website and app advertise their journeys to other commuters, and Coun Phil Ireland, cabinet member for sustainable transport, this week signed off a decision to extend it for another five years.

More than 2,150 people have signed up online, but only 11 per cent of those were actively sharing their spare seats as of February 1, according to a report.

Harrogate Borough Council will pump more than 23,000 into its car sharing scheme - as part of its drive to tackle the town's tail-to-tail traffic.

Coun Ireland told the Local Democracy Reporting Service: "I had absolutely no problem agreeing to carry on the scheme with Liftshare.com.

"Looking ahead at the next five years, we expect an increase on the 11 per cent figure."

As well as council staff, workers at Bettys, Taylors of Harrogate and Harrogate District Hospital have also signed up to the scheme as employer groups.

The report said more than 929,000 miles and £106,000 in fuel costs has been saved since the project was launched - and extending the scheme will save an estimated 183 tonnes in carbon emissions each year.

The council is directly responsible for around 10,000 tonnes of emissions each year and pays around £1.5million in energy and fuel bills.

The report added: "The council has committed to promoting car sharing as part of carbon reduction and air quality management plans.

"Continuing the scheme is necessary in order to meet the council’s carbon reduction and air quality aims."

The council has also previously spent £28,000 on the creation of a car sharing club - which is a model of car rental where people can hire a car from a pool of publicly-available vehicles for as long as required or for as little as half an hour.

By Jacob Webster, Local Democracy Reporter