Birds of prey and impact of 'abhorrent' killings on Nidderdale tourism draw

A pot of 4,000 remains in place as a reward for information leading to those responsible for the killings
A pot of 4,000 remains in place as a reward for information leading to those responsible for the killings

The impact of the 'abhorrent' killing of rare birds of prey on the district's tourism sector has been flagged by the Nidderdale Chamber of Trade, following two confirmed cases of shootings in North Yorkshire.

Police last week issued an appeal for information to track down those responsible for the shooting two rare birds, including a red kite which was found near Wath on Thursday, October 25. An adult buzzard was also discovered near Selby on Thursday, November 8, the bird had survived despite the shot shattering its collarbone, shoulder and humerus. It was later euthanised by vets.

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Chairman of the NCT, Keith Tordoff MBE last year helped establish a reward of £4,000 for information which could lead to the arrest of those behind the illegal killings.

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He said: "It is very sad that yet another red kite has been found dead as a result of being shot. Regrettably these raptors, which are a legally protected species, keep being targeted. The killing of these beautiful birds brings with it unwanted negative publicity which reflects badly on Nidderdale.

"The economy of Nidderdale is increasingly based around tourism and visitors want to come to an area where they enjoy nature at its best. The red kite is a bird that attracts visitors and is a major draw, as has been shown in other parts of the country.

"I am sure the majority of people who live and work in the Dales are appalled by the abhorrent act of a few who kill these birds."

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The reward is available through contacting Crimestoppers, who can be contacted by calling 0800 555 111.