Genuine Disney drawings sold at antiques fair

8/2/13 David Smith from Nepture Fine Arts with   a 1937 origional  production drawings from Snow White by the Walt Disney Studios  on sale  at the Pavilions of Harrogate Fine Art and Antiques fair for �2.500 each ,  the scenes was deleted from the finished film.
8/2/13 David Smith from Nepture Fine Arts with a 1937 origional production drawings from Snow White by the Walt Disney Studios on sale at the Pavilions of Harrogate Fine Art and Antiques fair for �2.500 each , the scenes was deleted from the finished film.

Authentic Disney drawings, including scenes never seen on screen, have sold for thousands of pounds at an antiques fair in Harrogate.

The collection featured original Mickey Mouse notepaper sketches, dating from 1931, and genuine painted film cells from Pooh Bear and Lady and the Tramp.

There was even a revealing series of drawings of Snow White’s dwarfs tackling a wood carving, uncovering a scene that didn’t make the film’s final cut.

“The collection is utterly charming,” said Sue Ede, organiser of the Harrogate Antiques and Fine Art Fair, held at The Pavilians last weekend.

“They are now more than 50 years old and are exactly the kind of desirable and nostalgic work of art that so many people find fascinating.”

Many of their artworks were either drawn by or came from the private collection of Thornton Hee (1911-1988).

He was an animator, caricature artist, director and teacher who worked for world-famous Walt Disney Studios during the 1930s.

He was known across the movie industry as ‘T.Hee’, and is most recognised for directing the Dance of the Hours segment of Fantasia.

Mr Hee joined The Walt Disney Company around 1937, and completed many of the sketches himself.

“Its Hollywood royalty,” said seller David Neptune, of Neptune Fine Art in Derbyshire.

“There’s huge interest in these drawings. They are just so well drawn.”

The drawings were part of a collection on sale at the fair at the Great Yorkshire Showground last weekend.

Sale organisers said it drew huge interest, with people travelling from as far afield as Newcastle and Scotland.

Two of the pictures sold to private collectors for £2,500.

“The sale was very busy, it surprised us how good it was,” said Duncan Phillips.

“We had a cracking attendance from start to finish, it was remarkable.

“The collection attracted a lot of interest.

“They add a touch of Hollywood nostalgia, they are artistic and memorable.”