WATCH: Last ever flight of Vulcan bomber

The last ever flight of Vulcan bomber XH5588 has taken place.

The huge historic aircraft took off for a final flypast before retirement.

The last ever flight of Vulcan bomber XH588 has taken place this afternoon Wednesday 28 October 2015. The story of the Vulcan begins at the end of WW2 when British military strategists started giving serious thought to how a nuclear deterrent could be delivered. The first RAF Vulcan squadron was formed at RAF Waddington on May 21st 1957. Success as a Cold War peacekeeper meant that the Vulcan might have flown its entire service life without ever entering combat if it hadn't been for the Falklands Conflict in 1982. During a marathon 8,000 mile return journey supported by eleven Victor tankers, Squadron Leader Martin Withers and his crew released the bombs over Port Stanley Airport that prevented Argentina operating its Mirage�III fighters from the island and initiated the campaign that recaptured the Islands.

The last ever flight of Vulcan bomber XH588 has taken place this afternoon Wednesday 28 October 2015. The story of the Vulcan begins at the end of WW2 when British military strategists started giving serious thought to how a nuclear deterrent could be delivered. The first RAF Vulcan squadron was formed at RAF Waddington on May 21st 1957. Success as a Cold War peacekeeper meant that the Vulcan might have flown its entire service life without ever entering combat if it hadn't been for the Falklands Conflict in 1982. During a marathon 8,000 mile return journey supported by eleven Victor tankers, Squadron Leader Martin Withers and his crew released the bombs over Port Stanley Airport that prevented Argentina operating its Mirage�III fighters from the island and initiated the campaign that recaptured the Islands.

XH588, which completed a farewell tour of the country earlier this month, took off from its base at Robin Hood Airport in Doncaster and its final flight lasted around 20 minutes.

It has been agreed with the airport that the flight would take place at very short notice so there was no disruption.

A spokesman said: “We have used almost all the available flying hours taking her to you, across the UK this year, flying more than 50 per cent longer than in any previous year, with many thanks to Marshall Aerospace, the Civil Aviation Authority, and K M Dastur, our aviation insurance brokers, for agreeing this extension.

“After such a fabulous year, we have only a handful of minutes left, so the final flight will be around 15 minutes with no display, simply saying Farewell to the Skies.”