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Sculpture to stand 20ft tall for le Tour and beyond

Simon Cotton, manager of Cedar Court Hotel; Daniel Varley, managing director of Metalcraft and Penny Garner, head of School Cultural, Contemporary and Heritage at Harrogate College.

Simon Cotton, manager of Cedar Court Hotel; Daniel Varley, managing director of Metalcraft and Penny Garner, head of School Cultural, Contemporary and Heritage at Harrogate College.

A 20ft sculpture designed by students will stand pride of place in the centre of Harrogate when the Tour de France passes through the district in July.

Harrogate College Art and Design students have been commissioned to create the landmark, to be displayed outside the Cedar Court Hotel.

The brief for students was to create a sculpture that represents Harrogate and its joy of hosting the Tour de France, but the sculpture design needed longevity to be a permanent fixture in Harrogate.

Cedar Court Hotel general manager Simon Cotton joined Daniel Varley, Managing Director of Metalcraft and Penny Garner, Head of School Cultural, Contemporary and Heritage at Harrogate College, in judging the marquettes made by students

Penny said: “The standard of the marquettes and the design plans that had been completed by the students were all of the highest level and there was huge breadth in terms of the interpretation of the design brief, which made being a judge challenging but extremely interesting.

“In the end, all three judges independently came to the same conclusion and the winning design was an outright and deserved winner.

“It will be exciting to see the marquette transformed into a full scale sculpture, which will be a lasting legacy to the Tour de France coming to Harrogate.”

Beckie Kirby’s design of ‘two spirals’ won.

The design consists of a 4D cyclist with spirals made from blue Perspex and metal behind it, placed on a tear drop-shaped stone base.

The basis of the design is around water and cycling.

Beckie explained: “When I thought of the Tour de France all I could think of was a bizarre and abstract design.

“I looked at water, Yorkshire materials such as stone and shapes that could portray my thoughts on Yorkshire and the Tour de France theme.

“I have been overwhelmed since finding out that I was the winner of the sculpture design but very excited about seeing it on a full scale.”

As the standard of entries was quite high, judges decided to choose another design they really liked in order to produce on a smaller scale that could be placed around the finishing line of the race.

This was awarded to Sarah Richardson with her design based on the history of cycles.

Sarah’s sculpture consisted of how cycles have evolved since the 1800’s to the 21st Century.

Mr Cotton said: “All the designs looked very professional and I was overly impressed with the thought processes the student had gone through.

“Beckie’s design stood out as it linked Harrogate to the Tour de France with the use of water, the cyclist and the tear drop shape but the design is also something that can be seen from afar and will create a huge impact once the helicopter cameras see it.

“It’s a 360 degree view and is a unique design that will have impact during the day and night with lights around it.

“Sarah’s design was simple yet effective as it shows the inclusion of all ages going in the right direction using a cycle and the use of the evolution of the cycle shows how the town and its residents have grown up as years have passed.”

The students will work with Mr Varley and his company Metalcrafts to get the sculptures ready for a March unveiling.

 
 
 

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