£30k research boost in memory of Chris

From left: Will Jones from Brains Trust, Sara Wilson, Professor Richard Grundy, Jean Wilson. Below: Chris Bramhall (S)

From left: Will Jones from Brains Trust, Sara Wilson, Professor Richard Grundy, Jean Wilson. Below: Chris Bramhall (S)

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A Harrogate family have handed over a cheque for £30,000 to medical researchers fighting to find a cure for the disease that killed their 21 year old son.

Mother Sara Wilson and grandmother Jean Wilson gave the funds to Professor Richard Grundy Nottingham University, in memory of Christopher Bramhall, who died of ependymoma, a rare kind of brain tumour, in January this year.

Christopher Bramhall

Christopher Bramhall

Sara said: “Chris by nature was modest and quiet. He faced his illness with great courage and humour never lettinghis treatments stop him from living life to the full.

“He was a talented guitarist and musician and managed also to earn four belts in Kung Fu inbetween treatments.”

Sara and Jean, along with Chris’s friends, family, and supporters set up Chris’s Ependymoma Treatment Appeal (CETA) to raise funds initially to help Chris with ground breaking treatments including cyberknife – a kind of robotic radiation surgery.

The fundraising included concerts, acoustic nights, CD releases, parachute jumps, street collections, fairs and raffles, and raised tens of thousands of pounds.

“It was Chris’s wish that the remaining money be donated to ependymoma research,” Sara added.

The £30,000 was presented to Professor Richard Grundy a leading researching based at the University of Nottingham’s Children’s Brain Tumour Research Centre.

Dr Grundy and his team will use the donation to fund a their next clinical trial in the search for treatments.

He said: “Improving the outcome of Ependymoma will only come from a better understanding of the underlying biology.

“While we have made progress in this regard we still have a long way to go and funding to keep this research going in very welcome.”

Chris was born in Harrogate in 1991, and went to Coppice Valley Primary School and Harrogate High.

He was first diagnosed with the rare cancer at just eight years old, and despite periods of remission and many different treatments, he lost his battle against the disease at the age of 21.