REVEALED: How new Tadcaster bridge will look

Artist's impression of the new Tadcaster bridge upstream. Picture: NYCC
Artist's impression of the new Tadcaster bridge upstream. Picture: NYCC

Artist's impressions of a new, wider bridge for Tadcaster have now been revealed as North Yorkshire County Council (NYCC) moves one step closer to reuniting the town.

The council have been exploring options to improve the service of the bridge to residents and traffic since it fell to the weight of the Christmas Day floods.

New lighting will be installed as part of the plans. Picture: NYCC

New lighting will be installed as part of the plans. Picture: NYCC

But now NYCC are in discussions with Historic England over widening and strengthening the structure before an application is made for planning consent and listed building consent.

LEP board member and County Councillor for Tadcaster, Chris Metcalfe said: “Widening the bridge is about giving the town a base from which it can grow so we want to get everything in place before we submit a planning application.”

The York, North Yorkshire and East Riding Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) recently awarded £1.4 million to the council to fund the widening and strengthening of the bridge.

This came on top of £3 million from the Government for its reconstruction which is already currently underway.

The formerly narrow carriageway will be widened as well as the pavements, providing better access for traffic and pedestrians. Picture: NYCC

The formerly narrow carriageway will be widened as well as the pavements, providing better access for traffic and pedestrians. Picture: NYCC

Before its collapse, Tadcaster's bridge had a narrow carriageway with footpaths down to one metre wide in places on each side and was lit by only one lighting column.

Using the funding allocated, the plans also involve widening the footpaths to two metres and improving the lighting, as well as strengthening the bridge against future floods.

Now artist’s impressions of the widened bridge and is in discussions with Historic England before an application is made for planning consent and listed building consent.