Better life chances for young people in Ripon and Leeds

School classroom stock'Pupils walk along a school corridor. 9 July 2002
School classroom stock'Pupils walk along a school corridor. 9 July 2002

The figures show that young people from Harrogate are more likely to be at university. It shows that, on average, 48 per cent of 16-18 year olds will be studying at a university, compared to 16 per cent in Hull and 17 per cent in Doncaster. That figure is 19 per cent in Bradford and 35 per cent in Leeds.

Data has discovered that students from the area are seven times more likely to go to an ‘elite’ university than their counterparts in Bradford, and twice as likely as those in Leeds.

HOLD FOR STORY BY JAMES REED'SWINNOW PRIMARY SCHOOL AT BRAMLEY,PICTURED WITH TEACHER MRS RUTH LEE WITH YEAR ONE.''''''STOCK; Child holds pencil, classroom, school.

HOLD FOR STORY BY JAMES REED'SWINNOW PRIMARY SCHOOL AT BRAMLEY,PICTURED WITH TEACHER MRS RUTH LEE WITH YEAR ONE.''''''STOCK; Child holds pencil, classroom, school.

What’s more, young people from the district are half as likely to be unemployed compared to the national average, and a third as likely to be full-time carers.

Harrogate and Knaresborough MP Andrew Jones said he wasn’t surprised to see the results of these surveys.

“The Harrogate district has a great reputation for good schools and a partnership approach to education between teachers, pupils and parents,” he said.

Two separate surveys have compared the district to the national average.

Classroom stock'General school classroom . 9 July 2002

Classroom stock'General school classroom . 9 July 2002

Data released by the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies found that people’s ‘life chances’ are determined by where they are born and brought up, setting up a website called www.comparefutures.org to compare by postcode.

It shows a stark contrast in what young people in different parts of England are likely to be doing at the age of 18.

The research found that young people in Hull are four times as likely to be unemployed as in Harrogate, and seven times more likely to be a carer.

An average of 48 per cent of young people in Harrogate will be studying at university, compared to 16 per cent in Hull and 17 per cent in Doncaster, 19 per cent in Bradford and 35 per cent in Leeds.

Classroom stock'General school classroom . 9 July 2002

Classroom stock'General school classroom . 9 July 2002

Young people in Bradford are nearly three times as likely to be unemployed as those in Harrogate, the survey found, while those in Hull are four times more likely to be out of work.

The second survey, released by the Department of Education (DoE) on July 17, details what percentage of pupils from different schools go on to university after A levels or equivalent.

It shows that pupils from North Yorkshire, and Harrogate and Ripon in particular, are considerably more likely to go to an elite university or even Oxbridge.

Nationally, the DoE estimates that around one in every three young adults go on to further studies after completing their A levels, in North Yorkshire that figure is 64 per cent.

“The statistics on how many pupils continue to university shows we have an exceptional standard of schools and brilliant teachers in them,” said Mr Jones.

“The culture of aspiration and challenge that runs in the schools is a crucial ingredient in this mix, and that culture doesn’t just stop at the school gate.

“I really enjoy visiting schools for the energy, enthusiasm and motivation on display from a great set of young people.”

The research shows figures for the percentage of pupils from Harrogate and Ripon schools who continued their education in 2008/09.

It showed that Harrogate Grammar saw 55 per cent of its pupils continue to university, 19 per cent to an elite university and two per cent to Oxbridge.

Harrogate High School, meanwhile, saw 35 per cent of its pupils continue to university, five per cent to an elite university, but less than one per cent to Oxbridge.

Rossett saw 43 per cent of its pupils continue to university, 13 per cent to an elite university and less than one per cent to Oxbridge.

St Aidan’s and St John Fisher Associated Sixth Form saw 59 per cent of its pupils continue to university, 20 per cent to an elite university and three per cent to Oxbridge.

In Knaresborough, King James’s School saw 52 per cent of its pupils continue to university, nine per cent to an elite university. Less than one per cent went to Oxbridge.

Ripon College, meanwhile, saw 35 per cent of its pupils continue to university, yet less than one per cent went to an elite university or to Oxbridge.

Ripon Grammar School saw 59 per cent of its pupils continue to university, 28 per cent - the second highest in North Yorkshire - to an elite university and three per cent to Oxbridge.

Highest in North Yorkshire was Skipton’s Ermysted’s Grammar School and Skipton Girls’ High School, which had 83 per cent and 86 per cent of its pupils continue in education and seven per cent to Oxbridge.