Showground rakes in £47m - study

15/7/10  The  Champion Bull  Eoin Mhor of Miungairigh in the Highland  leads the breed   during the final cattle parade in the main ring at  the Great Yorkshire Show
15/7/10 The Champion Bull Eoin Mhor of Miungairigh in the Highland leads the breed during the final cattle parade in the main ring at the Great Yorkshire Show
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Around £47m is added to the region’s economy each year through the events that take place on the Great Yorkshire Showground in Harrogate, a new study has revealed.

Of that, some £35m directly benefits the local Harrogate economy and supports 550 full-time equivalent jobs.

The in-depth economic impact study was carried out last month by Leeds-based consultants Genecon, on behalf of the Yorkshire Agricultural Society (YAS).

The YAS stages the annual Great Yorkshire Show, and also has an event-organising arm, which incorporates Pavilions of Harrogate and the Yorkshire Event Centre – both key parts of the survey.

A number of elements were examined, including the YAS’s spend within the supply chain, its employees, exhibitors and visitors.

Heather Parry, deputy chief executive of the YAS, said: “We attract around 422,000 visitors to the showground each year, to a total of 582 events, which means that on average we hold 1.6 events each day of the year.

“With so many events attracting big visitor numbers, it’s not surprising that the financial benefit to the region is significant – whether that’s in terms of hotel rooms booked, meals bought in local restaurants, or in the number of people we employ.

“We are very much a part of the local community so it’s good to be able to quantify the amazing impact of our events in boosting the region’s economy.”

The YAS spends over £5m each year – mostly with local businesses – to help run a wide range of events, including the Harrogate Spring and Autumn Flower Shows, antiques shows and numerous social events including weddings and balls.

All profits are ploughed back into its work supporting agriculture across the north of England and beyond.